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Digger

Post Office.

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I recently needed a parcel delivered from UK to a mail box shop in Ceglie Messapica.

It was addressed by the sender correctly apart from the post code which should have read 72013 but they had written 72016. The incorrect post code was scribbled out with a biro and the package returned, after 1 month, to the sender in the UK.

So even though the shop name, street and number, town, region, and country were all correct some jobsworth decided this was a heinous crime worthy of the most drastic action available him.

 

It would be slightly more understandable if the post code was important, narrowing it down to a few dozen individual addresses, but when it only refers to an area covering thousands of square kilometres I can't see why they even bother with them in the first place.

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Very frustrating and expensive - definitely a case of pre-meditated negative customer service on behalf of sorter...begs the question are we considered customers at all, you could change your name to "Diggerlini" see if that makes a difference. Perhaps the city code simply works well on a spreadsheet for accounting purposes.

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I had the same problem in UK we kept on getting post addressed to other people, same street name post code was E6 instead of ours (we had an extra digit) I kept on putting the letters back in post box but they kept on coming back to us.Went to the PO and they said that nobody would read any comment made on the envelope unless the post code is crossed out and the sorting machine rejects it

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So we're sunk when the automated sorting system creates a pile for decision making by the robot anomalies supervisor... :(

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also there should be what looks like a bar coding that needs crossing out too, must admit that when I started crossing things out they didn't come back to us.

 

It got ridiculous one letter was delivered to us 3 times as I put a date each time i put it back in the letter box

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Can't beat the dear old nosey postmen and ladies that would offer the human touch when required - they were good at their job then and the shorts were cool.

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Nothing complicated, I just remember them looking smart in their uniform shorts in Summer - most of ours walked but around the South coast they cycled and looked tanned & healthy. I have probably got my rose tinted glasses on...

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Nothing complicated, I just remember them looking smart in their uniform shorts in Summer - most of ours walked but around the South coast they cycled and looked tanned & healthy. I have probably got my rose tinted glasses on...

But shorts in Yorkshire all winter! Why?

 

I really should ask my buddy justin, he was a postie a few years back.

 

More on topic can somebody please explain why we don't have more detailed postcodes in Italy?? Ones that actually relate to a contrada or masseria area??

 

Few times I've resorted to the unique Google code for our location for others..

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Why don't they have precise post codes in Italy?

Probably because the majority of houses outside of the city limits don't even have official addresses, hence the need for mailboxes.

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Also, the allocation of house numbers is very haphazard. We're in a (pretty wide-reaching) "Zona F". We were allocated the number 85/A, which normally you would expect to be near number 85, but the latter is a house way up the main road, not even on our street (which, of course, has no name). No logic at all!

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Why don't they have precise post codes in Italy?

Probably because the majority of houses outside of the city limits don't even have official addresses, hence the need for mailboxes.

I see. Makes sense. We have no mailbox either. No point right now. I can see evidence of an old one built into the concrete pillars at the bottom of our driveway....

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So we have all probably heard snippets from people over time but doing a bit of a “pink panther” on the history…generally the larger population mostly lived in Cities/towns except for those employed in agriculture and associated trades. This would relate to many of the original routes given names of bigger estates or Masseria as landmarks. Schools and chapels were created between the farms to service the families. The contradas that perhaps began as cart paths were defined by either main route to masseria X or as a joining path between X & Y, or a name defined by topography (shoulder blade/spine/monte something). Some later unmade lanes took on “corner off contrada X to Y. Others seem to have developed from a person known for their trade such as Carpenter or Blacksmith. In a similar fashion, the original City started to spread outside the walls that enclosed the historic centre and so roads were given names dependant on the governing style of the time or relating to churches/monasteries/parishes/communities.

It seems that only in the last century that as big farms were required to segment plots off for citizens to develop as smaller productive family cooperatives (perhaps in times of hardship, war and Mussolini). Then they created “summer properties” initially to house equipment, a few animals and manage harvests which some still are (classed as rural). Others began to grow into longer-term residences helping to accommodate growing families with plots that would service their needs. I am assuming that these would be passed along over several generations to where sons and daughters have been able to develop more full time residential buildings. These by now, will often be “urbanised” on the City/Province register but may have been given a number relating to when they were referenced or created rather than in the case of a whole road that was developed at the same time. Therefore, the approach has been historical, with most long-standing citizens understanding the system and holding city addresses used for postal purposes. Only recently, has there been a requirement to examine a solution to increasing urbanisation.

The residents are now so spread out that it would not be very cost effective to have post delivered by hand to every property but you can now apply to be part of a cluster of mailboxes at the end of a primary contrada - which makes it easier for postperson and you collect as you pass to work or shopping. Does not work for parcels though- this may require an edge of town depot with easy access to collect larger items.

Would love to hear thoughts from others.

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